TI calls on gov't to prosecute and punish the corrupt

Transparency International | .

PUTRAJAYA - Transparency International today called on the Malaysian government to ensure independent investigations into corruption allegations, and that prosecutions and punishments are followed through, irrespective of who is implicated.

Malaysia is facing a major corruption crisis. Representatives from more than 110 Transparency International chapters and members at its Annual Membership Meeting from around our global Movement asked the government to ensure independent investigations into all corruption allegations.

“If Malaysia is to get through its current crisis then the government must let those who know how to investigate corruption do their job. The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission must be able to act independently and be free from political interference,” said José Ugaz, chair of Transparency International.

The call from the Transparency International Movement was one of three resolutions passed today at the global anti-corruption organisation’s Annual Membership Meeting in Putrajaya, Malaysia.

Transparency International also resolved to press for reconciliation and amnesty laws that do not legalise impunity. This resolution was passed as the Tunisian parliament considers a draft law that would allow people who stole public funds to be given amnesty for past crimes. In Mongolia, a new law would grant amnesty to anyone being investigated by the anti-corruption commission.   

The Transparency International Movement also resolved to push for reforms and practices that address financial systems that facilitate tax evasion and that allow those responsible to escape justice.

The Annual Membership Meeting of Transparency International has also elected Nada Abdelsater-Abusamra of the Lebanese Transparency Association and re-elected incumbent board member Iftekhar Zaman as board members.

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